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Some details of Basic Seed Cheeze

Cultured food is one of the four living food groups, along with fresh foods, sprouted foods, and dried foods. Seed cheeze, a cultured food, is a great way to maintain healthy flora in your digestive system. This basic version, like tofu, is very versatile and can be used in many recipes that call for tofu.

Seed cheeze can be made from any seed, although sunflower and pumpkin seeds seem to work the best. Dr. Ann Wigmore, the mother of sprouts and wheatgrass, taught me howto make seed cheeze during my time at her school, Dr. Ann Wigmore’s Institute for Living Food Studies. This dish is one of the foundations of the living food movement.

MAKES 4 CUPS

Cups sunflower, pumpkin, or sesame seeds Filtered water. tablespoon Rejuvelac or whey starter (optional) Place the sunflower seeds in a ½-gallon glass jar and fill the jar to the top with the water. Cover with a cloth, screen, or mesh and soak overnight. The next morning, drain and rinse the seeds. Place the seeds in a food processor and pulse with 2 cups fresh water a few times, until chunky.

Pour into a clean jar and cover with cheesecloth. If desired, add the rejuvelac or whey starter to make the seeds culture faster. Place the jar in a dark, warm place for 10 to 12 hours, or only 6 to 8 hours if rejuvelac was added. The curds (solid part) and whey (liquid part) should separate. The seed cheeze should smell slightly sour and cultured, like yogurt.

Conclusion

Drain off as much whey as you can, reserving it for other uses. Squeeze the curds in a piece of cheesecloth to remove the remaining whey. (If you do this over a bowl you can save this whey, too.) The dry curds are the seed cheeze and are now ready for use. To store or shape the cheeze, pack it into a bowl or container, cover, and refrigerate for up to 2 days.

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