Page 7 of 8 FirstFirst ... 5678 LastLast
Results 61 to 70 of 77
  1. #61
    ChaoticHeart is offline Member Frequent Poster
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    71

    Default Thanks!

    Thank you so much I am going to print that out and try it tomorrow when I go to the tennis court. So far I think I am following most of those directions already so it should be fine; now its just the hard part of tennis, practice.

  2. #62
    kawaiikitsune is offline Senior Member Community Builder
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Somewhere over the rainbow
    Posts
    4,381

    Default

    Yeah.... Practice, practice, practice.... I didn't have time to play tennis at all last semester. ;_; I still don't really have too much time. But I'll definintely take the pointers about hitting a two-handed backhand and improving serve. ^.^

  3. #63
    d.A. is offline Senior Member Well Known
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Socal.
    Posts
    304

    Default

    That's a common misconception. The topspin requires a lot less work than the flat serve, mainly because you don't have to concentrate on getting it in as much. Especially for shorter players that have an innate disadvantage since the window of a flat serve going in for them is much lower than for someone taller.

    The average window for a flat serve is about an inch over the net, for a beginner that inch is a too small of a window for them to fit a flat serve at a consistent rate. Taller players can and should learn the flat serve first but I doubt anyone reading these is 6'4" or taller.

    A beginner's topspin usually doesn't have any topspin in it, the actual "topspin" is generated after about 75-150 practice serves, you don't need to worry about "mastering" the spin at all. It's like a topspin forehand, the spin comes naturally.

    Well the flat serve is the second serve I would learn, the problem with learning it first is that people get too caught up with power and speed and never develop a reliable serve. Personally, I love playing against players without a consistent serve, you can force them to make so many mistakes without having to do anything but have an aggressive stance.

    The flat serve attains the most power, but also requires you to be comfortable enough to go after high risk shots which I don't recommend for beginners. I'll type one up for the flat serve a little later.

    Also the Kick / Twist serve is a lot harder than the topspin serve. They do use similar motions though.

    Join the movement today.

  4. #64
    kawaiikitsune is offline Senior Member Community Builder
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Somewhere over the rainbow
    Posts
    4,381

    Default

    Lol. Then I guess I'll keep the flat serve instructions in the back of my mind. I'll concentrate on getting the serve in the box first. Haha. Plus, I guess I don't fall under the "tall player category" either. *5'2"* And I haven't grown for years. Lol.

  5. #65
    aznrockdrummer is offline Member Frequent Poster
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    84

    Default

    hmm... thanks again d.A, i definetely have a lot to practice tommorow. umm, i have to ask again... i am working on my kick serve, but after reading what you said... could it be that my normal serve is a topspin? For a first serve, i use a eastern grip, and hit at one-o-clock, and for my second serve, i use the semi-western grip, and hit slightly to the left of my head. I always get more power in the first serve, of couse, but my second serve goes in more and is lots more accurate.

  6. #66
    d.A. is offline Senior Member Well Known
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Socal.
    Posts
    304

    Default

    Probably not. But from what you say, it sounds like an unorthodox flat serve. Although I still can’t tell properly just from the info you mentioned. Describe the wrist flick and the direction the racket points to after the wrist flick. And specify whether you are left or right handed.

    Here’s a quick guide on the wrist movements of each type of serve. Try holding a racket in your hand while you follow the guide below.

    For the following examples use the clock face to describe the motion of your wrist, the center of the clock being the wrist is pointed up vertically, twelve-o’clock meaning forward with your palm facing down, six-o’clock meaning backward with your palm facing up and so on. Again, the guide below is specified for right-handers.

    Also for the examples, you are serving on the deuce (right) side of the court toward the add (left) side of the court.

    Flat serves have a small incomplete vertical wrist flick usually going starting from a vertical position going to the eleven-o’clock direction, usually hitting the ball at a 45 degree angle facing forward. The Racket face should solidly contact the ball and should push it along the path of the wrist flick.

    A topspin serve has a partially horizontal wrist flick going eight-o’clock to three-o’clock. You start at eight-o’clock with your palm faced toward the add side of the opposite court while flicking clockwise and ending around one-o’clock like you are throwing a ball. The flick isn’t vertical or horizontal but is leaning forward more vertical than horizontal. A proper topspin serve should solidly contact the ball but will brush the ball upward as it leaves the racket face.

    A kick serve is like the wrist flick from a topspin serve but the wrist flick starts at nine-o’clock (behind your head at this point)clockwise and ends at one-o’clock in an upside-down “J” movement. The kick serve will brush the ball upon contact with the racket face but will add solid force at the downward part of the upside-down “J” movement.

    A slice serve like the topspin starts in the eight-o’clock direction but unlike the topspin, flicks vertically instead of a throwing style wrist flick. The vertical wrist flick should cut the back of the ball rather than hitting it solidly.

    These are for the orthodox serves, some people have an unorthodox serve that might work for them as well but only they can improve them. For beginners I highly recommend just learning the orthodox topspin serve. Once you can play competitively by aiming for the corners accurately and can get your serve at near nine out of ten times consistently then move on the next serve.

    The order I recommend learning them is:

    1) Topspin
    1a) Down the line topspin
    1b) Alley topspin
    2) Flat
    3) Slice
    4) Kick

    Slightly confusing I know, but I hope it helps.

    Join the movement today.

  7. #67
    aznrockdrummer is offline Member Frequent Poster
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    84

    Default

    hmm... Thanks, d.A... I think i might just have an unorthodox serve. I am right handed, for my "flat" serve, the wrist flick starts with my racket facing up, just before i am going to hit the ball (vertical) and ends facing at the opponent, except a little up.
    The way my coach taught us was :
    1. Flat
    2. Slice
    3 Topspin
    4. Kick

  8. #68
    xxsaznpride is offline Senior Member Always Around
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Cali
    Posts
    1,480

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by d.A. View Post
    That's a common misconception. The topspin requires a lot less work than the flat serve, mainly because you don't have to concentrate on getting it in as much. Especially for shorter players that have an innate disadvantage since the window of a flat serve going in for them is much lower than for someone taller.

    Flat's easier for me. It was also the first serve I learned. I'm 5'5, Asian (surprisingly not so nerdy... strange?), right handed. My topspin serve's a laughing attack waiting to happen (shanks from time to time), but my flat's a monster, apparently. It's among the fastest on my team (even though I'm just a JV level guy).

    Also... seapking of unorthodox serve, I have one for the ad-side only. I was trying to do the Twist serve like Ryoma looked like he was hitting it in the earlier chapters of the series, and I kind of... reverse sliced it. I used a Western grip for my serves back then, and it had enough spin to go from heading toward the direct center of the court to spinning out all the way to the right (sometimes onto the next court over). ~Not a healthy serve though.

    And for people who haven't learned anything yet, I agree with how you'd teach serves. Consistency > Power any day (except for me...) because power's more fun.



    Wait... what thread was this again?
    Quote Originally Posted by AvatarST
    And your name's annoying to type; from now on you're sazny.
    Farleen // Number 42

  9. #69
    kawaiikitsune is offline Senior Member Community Builder
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Somewhere over the rainbow
    Posts
    4,381

    Default

    Lol. The thread started with Fayte sharing with all of us how he did a metal bell hit in ping pong. Haha. And I guess it just kinda went off track from there. This should be changed to "Learn how to play tennis with d.A." Lol.

  10. #70
    d.A. is offline Senior Member Well Known
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Socal.
    Posts
    304

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by d.A.
    Flat serves have a small incomplete vertical wrist flick usually starting from a vertical position going to the eleven-o’clock direction, usually hitting the ball at a 45 degree angle facing forward. The Racket face should solidly contact the ball and should push it along the path of the wrist flick.
    Quote Originally Posted by aznrockdrummer
    I am right handed, for my "flat" serve, the wrist flick starts with my racket facing up, just before i am going to hit the ball (vertical) and ends facing at the opponent, except a little up.
    Sounds familiar doesn't it? You are using an orthodox flat serve. Although from what you say you can easily improve your serve by hitting the ball slightly higher while flicking your wrist more. It seems you are currently only using the momentum of the swing and your forehand strength to move the ball. Adding the force from a more complete wrist flick will increase your speed. Try it so your wrist is facing downwards after your serve. Of course the timing of your hit should be a little earlier with this adjustment, hope it helps.

    I also hope your coach didn't each you those serves one after another, doing that is really bad for players, you really should master one before going on to the next.

    And yea the thread went off on a huge tangent. It started with me briefly skimming this thread to see if anyone discussed the impossibility of being able to do the metal bell shot on a whim, but then I saw that debate on the one-handed backhand versus the two-handed backhand and I just had to place my input. If someone makes a "how to play tennis" thread, I'll gladly repost my material there.

    Join the movement today.

 

 
Page 7 of 8 FirstFirst ... 5678 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
vBulletin Skin by: ForumThemes.com
Powered by vBulletin® Version 4.2.0
Copyright © 2014 vBulletin Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162