Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Rurouni Kenshin

  1. #1
    The Witcher is offline Senior Member Always Around
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Planet Earth, Milky Way Galaxy
    Posts
    1,188

    Default Rurouni Kenshin

    After a fair bit of searching I was unable to find a thread for this. I started this thread to facilitate discussions on this excellent series.

    I'll start off by asking a question that's been nagging me for a while. In Volume 6 the mangaka includes a short story about one of the previous Hiko Seijuros that he apparently wrote a few years before RK. In it he wields a sword called Fuyutsuki('Winter Moon') that is apparently an heirloom of Hiten Mitsurugi that has been passed down from generation to generation. Can anyone clarify whether it is the same sword that Hiko Seijuro XIII(Kenshin's master) uses in the series? It has a similar appearance but lacks the hilt inscription. Does the databook say anything about it?

    EDIT: Nobody's responded...well I have another question; where did Shogo Amakusa(the filler villain from the 'Son of God' arc) learn the Hiten Mitsurugi? Hiko couldn't have taught him, since he said he wouldn't take another pupil after Kenshin.
    Last edited by The Witcher; 11-26-2008 at 04:39 AM.
    I'M NO HERO, BELIEVE IT!

  2. #2
    ki0
    ki0 is offline Member Frequent Poster
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    82

    Default

    I believe he was taught by his uncle. If I remember correctly his uncle was a disciple of one of the former Hiko's. Amakusa's uncle didn't past the final test and learn ARH, but he survived. He taught Amakusa, who had a natural talent and learned ARH just from hearing about it.

  3. #3
    The Witcher is offline Senior Member Always Around
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Planet Earth, Milky Way Galaxy
    Posts
    1,188

    Default

    ^Typical filler bullshit. The technique Kenshin almost died(and almost killed his master) to learn was mastered by an upstart who never even saw it performed? Plot-wise that's wa copout done solely to produce a filler Hiten Mitsurugi master for Kenshin to fight. Plus it goes against both the manga and the Reflections OVA that say Hiten Mitsurugi would die with Hiko.
    Last edited by The Witcher; 11-30-2008 at 03:10 AM.
    I'M NO HERO, BELIEVE IT!

  4. #4
    Urameshi-sama is offline Senior Member Community Builder
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    9,167

    Default

    ^Of course it's filler bullshit, considering that the hiten mitsurugi style was so secluded that it stayed within one lineage of one person continually passing the style onto one pupil, with the master or pupil dying when it came time to learn AKRH. That and the fact that another person knowing the style would pretty much automatically be elevated to battosai level rule it out as a possibilty. Also, the Seijuro Hiko we also know claimed to be the last master of the style.

    As for Hiko's claim that hiten mitsurugi died with him, that's ridiculous considering Yahiko's implied integration of the style with his own sword-catching taijutsu.
    Stolen Sig Count: 25

  5. #5
    The Witcher is offline Senior Member Always Around
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Planet Earth, Milky Way Galaxy
    Posts
    1,188

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Urameshi-sama View Post
    Also, the Seijuro Hiko we also know claimed to be the last master of the style.
    True. If we take Shogo as canon then he is the real last master of the Hiten Mitsurugi since he's likely to outlive Hiko and his body appears to be suitable for the style unlike Kenshin's. Which makes me wonder how his ARH lost to Kenshin's when he had superior weight, speed and strength.

    Quote Originally Posted by Urameshi-sama View Post
    As for Hiko's claim that hiten mitsurugi died with him, that's ridiculous considering Yahiko's implied integration of the style with his own sword-catching taijutsu.
    I thought the only technique he successfully copied was Ryi Tsui Sen? And his three-finger sword catching is different from Kenshin's. Besides he never saw Kenshin catching Aoshi's swords with his own eyes.
    I'M NO HERO, BELIEVE IT!

  6. #6
    ki0
    ki0 is offline Member Frequent Poster
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    82

    Default

    If only Enishi was in the anime...

    Shishio, Enishi and Soujirou shold have formed a team to kill Kenshin and his gang.

  7. #7
    Urameshi-sama is offline Senior Member Community Builder
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    9,167

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by The Witcher View Post
    I thought the only technique he successfully copied was Ryi Tsui Sen? And his three-finger sword catching is different from Kenshin's. Besides he never saw Kenshin catching Aoshi's swords with his own eyes.
    The only move Yahiko demonstrated was Ryu Tsu Sen, but I felt it was implied that Yahiko would eventually integrate Kenshin's techniques once his body could since he performed it purely out of memory. And I never said Kenshin's sword catching was the same as Yahiko's; hence my description of it as an integrated style. I'm also pretty sure the narration in the manga directly told us that the hiten mitsurugi lived on in Yahiko.
    Stolen Sig Count: 25

  8. #8
    The Witcher is offline Senior Member Always Around
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Planet Earth, Milky Way Galaxy
    Posts
    1,188

    Default

    A second question, and one that probably only someone's who's well-versed in this manga will be able to answer(hence I likey won't get a reply anytime soon<sigh>).

    At the end of the Jinchuu arc, Kenshin takes Kaoru to Tomoe's grave and tells Tomoe "Thank you, sorry....and goodbye." Plot-wise this is significant because it means he's finally gotten over Tomoe's death and is ready to openly reciprocate Kaoru's feelings and settle down with her(they get married not long after).

    What I wanted to ask is how deep was that "goodbye"? Did it simply mean that while he still loved Tomoe, he was no longer hung up on her and willing to find new love; or did it mean that he was really saying goodbye to Tomoe in a romantic sense and no longer saw her as a lover?
    I'M NO HERO, BELIEVE IT!

  9. #9
    dizzcity is offline Senior Member Long Time Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    891

    Default

    Oh, yay, finally, a non-anime-related question I can answer!

    Personally, I thought it meant that he was no longer hung up about her and was willing to move on to find a new love with Kaoru. I can't see where he would think that he had to give up on her as a lover - Kenshin to my mind doesn't come across as someone who would deny the past like that. (In fact, it's almost the opposite... he's constantly burdened by the past, as shown by his scar). Tomoe was his wife, he had loved her, and that love was true. But she has died, and the Jinchuu arc released him from the burden of her death, and it's now time to move on. To deny that he had loved her sounds strange. Besides, Kaoru and Kenshin still decided to visit her grave every year, right? That shows that he hasn't forgotten her, but just... moved on. And incorporated the lessons learned from his relationship with her to his relationship with Kaoru.

    Thematically, if you look at the whole manga's story arc, the central facet of Kenshin's character has always been atonement for past sins and the guilt represented by the cross-shaped scar. That's why the last scene and conversation in the manga between Kaoru and Kenshin, about the cross starting to fade, is so significant as well, because it serves as a fitting end, thematically. Kenshin has been suffering all this time because of guilt, like a festering wound inside of him. The Jinchuu arc and Kaoru's death brought things to a climax, making the wound erupt out to the surface and nearly incapacitating him. But through that, he gained new insight on how to atone for his sins - by living his life so that he (and Tomoe through him) can smile. That was the real cure, and showing it to Enishi and visiting Tomoe's grave was just visible symptoms of that inner change in Kenshin's focus. And then, finally, after he has achieved that change, he is exhorted by Kaoru to rest at the end of his labours.

    So, in a sense, I don't really view Tomoe's grave scene as a romantic incident, but rather I see Tomoe as the personification of the sum of all of his guilty feelings about being a hitokiri in the past. And when he laid her spirit to rest and said goodbye, he also finally put down the burden he's been carrying all these years, and started anew.

    -Dizzy-
    Manga Genre Focus: Romance, Comedy, Slice-of-life. Primarily shounen, then seinen and shoujo.
    Currently watching:

  10. #10
    The Witcher is offline Senior Member Always Around
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Planet Earth, Milky Way Galaxy
    Posts
    1,188

    Default

    Thaks for your insight. I found the Kenshin/Tomoe relationship to be beautiful and was concerned by the fact that all his (non-flashback) interactions with her appeared to be simply, well, platonic rather than romantic. He never says any words like 'beloved' or 'I love you' to her when he speaks her 'spirit' in his dream or at her grave, and afterwards he never sees her in his dreams ever again; so it seemed that he may no longer be seeing her in a romantic light.

    In that particular aspect(Tomoe's send-off), I like the Reflections OVA better than the manga conclusion. Kaoru openly admits that she can't take Tomoe's place in Kenshin's heart, but she doesn't want to; Kenshin's got a large heart and there's plenty of room for her, so she just asks Tomoe to 'please, leave Kenshin to me'.
    I'M NO HERO, BELIEVE IT!

 

 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
vBulletin Skin by: ForumThemes.com
Powered by vBulletin® Version 4.2.0
Copyright © 2014 vBulletin Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162