Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 31
  1. #1
    Hayashi Rato is offline Member Frequent Poster
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    51

    Default real life eyeshield 21

    is there a real life eyeshield 21? is there an actual great running back (he doesnt have to run 4.2) theres one on the USC trojans, running back ( i think) but anyone else?

  2. #2
    Hardboiled is offline Junior Member Newbie
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    12

    Default

    if you're talking about reggie bush, he's in the NFL now.

  3. #3
    Zangetsu3351 is offline Junior Member Newbie
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    8

    Default

    LaDainian Tomlinson of the San Diego Chargers wears the number 21 and a tinted eyeshield just like Sena.

  4. #4
    d.A. is offline Senior Member Well Known
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Socal.
    Posts
    304

    Default

    Reggie Bush wore #5 in college. He is talking about Lendale White who wasn't even the best runningback on his team although he wore #21 on the Trojans from 2002-2005.

    Real life players who could be the basis for Eyeshield 21?



    Willis McGahee of the Buffalo Bills was still in college when the manga came out but he could be it. He's more comparable to Panther in both body type and running style though.



    Tiki Barber of the New York Giants was just coming off the end of his "prime" just as the manga came out. He could be it, he's a likely hall of famer as well.



    LaDainian Tomlinson of the San Diego Chargers is the most likely one. He had a record breaking season right before the Eyeshield 21 manga came out. Argueably the best runningback in the NFL today - He's the only runningback in both the NFL and NCAA that wears both the number 21 and a tinted eye visor while being worthy enough to be mentioned.


    All three of the above have a running style that easily could be the basis of the Eyeshield 21 character. LT leading the pack of course.
    Last edited by d.A.; 10-24-2006 at 08:25 PM. Reason: Added material.

    Join the movement today.

  5. #5
    Hayashi Rato is offline Member Frequent Poster
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    51

    Default

    oooh all nice.......but can any of them run 4.2? the one who made eyeshield 21 knows a fair deal of american football, maybe some players....too

  6. #6
    d.A. is offline Senior Member Well Known
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Socal.
    Posts
    304

    Default

    As far as running a 4.2 goes: no football player, no trackstar, no legend has ever run a 4.2 on an official track. Even Ben Johnson, the fastest overall sprinter ever, ran only a 4.38 at the 1988 Olympics: that's while he was on steroids too. Cornerback DeAngelo Hall of the Atlanta Falcons has the unofficial college record with a 4.15. The legendary shutdown cornerback Deion Sanders was rumored to have ran a sub 4.1 in his prime as well, but again it's unofficial.
    Last edited by d.A.; 10-24-2006 at 03:38 PM. Reason: Typos.

    Join the movement today.

  7. #7
    dkhw is offline Senior Member Well Known
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Novi, MI
    Posts
    337

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by d.A. View Post
    As far as running a 4.2 goes: no football player, no trackstar, no legend has ever run a 4.2 on an official track. Even Ben Johnson, the fastest overall sprinter ever, ran only a 4.38 at the 1988 Olympics: that's while he was on steroids too. Cornerback DeAngelo Hall of the Atlanta Falcons has the unofficial college record with a 4.15. The legendary shutdown cornerback Deion Sanders was rumored to have ran a sub 4.1 in his prime as well, but again it's unofficial.
    but 40 yard is for football only. for sprinters, its 100m. also, i really have to ask u where you got the 4.38 for the fastest overall sprinter, because reggie bush has ran 40 yard in 4.31 (official) and hes not the fastest sprinter in the world.

  8. #8
    Hayashi Rato is offline Member Frequent Poster
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    51

    Default

    well the creator of the manga woulda gotten his facts from real life stuff! there shoulda been someone, even from a hella long time ago, that ran 4.2......or just a timing error.....

  9. #9
    d.A. is offline Senior Member Well Known
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Socal.
    Posts
    304

    Default

    Yes the 40 yard dash is a football statistic, but sprinters very often run the 60 yard dash for training purposes. As for the 4.38 number, that’s what Canadian Ben Johnson was clocked in at the 40 yard mark in his record breaking day in the 1988 Seoul Olympics. Had his records not been stripped due to his undeniable usage of steroids, his records for the 100 meter, 150 meter and 200 meter dashes would be in good standing today – he is widely regarded as the fastest man with the help of steroids. His time trials from that day remain the fastest “accurate” measurements of the 40 yard dash in history. The Olympic “accurate” is much more strict than any professional program in the world. I would use Justin Gatlin's (current world record holder for the 100 meter dash) times as reference but Justin Gatlin is an "afterburner" sprinter that has a higher maximum speed and a slower start in comparision to Ben Johnson.

    As for the NFL, Reggie Bush was clocked in at 4.33 (official) and Houston Texan Jerome Mathis ran a 4.28 (official). Many sprinting professionals (Olympic committee included) find it hard to believe that two slightly above average college track talents are only a nose behind the NCAA leaders in the 100 meter dash. Frankly it’s kind of hard to believe that half the NFL would challenge the Olympic field for sprinting if they were to participate. Sure it’s based on split times but still, these football players who don’t even focus on speed regimens are suddenly capable of keeping up with world level sprinters that train specifically for sprinting? Unrealistic by any logical thinking.

    The math for it:

    1 yard = .9144 meters; 40 yards = 36.576 meters; that’s 36.576% of a 100 yard dash. The main equation is:

    (40 Yard Dash Time) / 36.576 - (A small number to cancel out the acceration resistance) = A valid 100 meter dash time.

    Since we can't accurately measure acceration resistance I'll leave that out of my numbers.

    Using that, Jerome Mathis would run a 100 meter dash in 11.7 and Reggie Bush would run a 11.838; that’s faster than three-fourths of the Olympic qualifiers. Add in the fact that that’s using a number that includes accelerating from a zero terminal velocity and their times would be a lot faster than that. Even bordering sub 10 seconds. Unless the NFL is suddenly on par with world sprinting, something is wrong with NFL timing system.

    The record for the 60 yard dash is 6.39 by Maurice Greene in 1998, and since 40 yards is 2/3rds of the 60 yard dash, you can accurately estimate the 60 yard dash time from the 40 yard dash time. Let's take Jerome Mathis as an example. Using his 4.28 and dividing it by 2/3rds to compensate for the extra 20 meters, we get 6.30 - a number that beats Maurice Greene's record by almost a full tenth of a second. Jerome Mathis's 60 yard dash time in this sense already beats the world record holder, add in the fact that his terminal velocity is much higher at the 40 yard mark than the 0 yard mark and his time would only get faster, beating the record by an even bigger margin. Jermone Mathis is the fastest 60 yard dash sprinter in the world? I think not.


    While I do think the mark 4.2 has been broken, I just think that the NFL’s "official" times are hardly official at all.

    Here’s an in-depth olympic committee article I found that includes most of the points I brought about.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hayashi Rato
    there shoulda been someone, even from a hella long time ago, that ran 4.2......or just a timing error.....
    Actually a 4.2 time on the 40 yard dash is the equivalent of a long distance runner running a mile in four minutes flat. It was believed for a long time that no one could run a 4 minute mile – same for the 4.2 in the 40 yard dash which still hasn’t been broken officially. Rather than using the number because someone accomplished a 4.2, I'm sure the author used it as a reference number. For the lack of a better term; it’s a “magic goal” that athletes strive to accomplish - like scoring 100 points in a basketball game or pitching the perfect game in baseball or getting perfect 10s in gymnastics or ice skating.
    Last edited by d.A.; 11-10-2006 at 10:47 AM. Reason: Typo.

    Join the movement today.

  10. #10
    Hayashi Rato is offline Member Frequent Poster
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    51

    Default

    wow you know alot about football.......so for 4 min mile.....thats a non-stop full speed run?
    that article is pretty impressive...... but still i agree with yah when yah say that te 4.2 mark was beaten......

 

 
Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
vBulletin Skin by: ForumThemes.com
Powered by vBulletin® Version 4.2.0
Copyright © 2014 vBulletin Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79