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  1. #11
    Malkavian Sniper is offline Senior Member Regular
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    w00t!!! go LT!!!
    Today, I got lost on the road of life.

  2. #12
    El Gus is offline Senior Member Long Time Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hayashi Rato View Post
    well the creator of the manga woulda gotten his facts from real life stuff! there shoulda been someone, even from a hella long time ago, that ran 4.2......or just a timing error.....
    ES21 isn't a biography. Just because the authro borrowed some things about a player from someone else, doesn't mean he has to conform to reality in all fields.

    That is, unless you also happen to know of a football player who was known for carrying around large firearms when he was in highschool.
    Why So Green And Lonely? We Are Accidents Waiting To Happen.

  3. #13
    Hayashi Rato is offline Member Frequent Poster
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    most mangaka's use lotsa real life stuff to make their manga.....the samurais of the recent 46th episode is real...... the chars arent real shure, but the other stuff, the fastest speed of the NFL i believe is real

  4. #14
    dkhw is offline Senior Member Well Known
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    Quote Originally Posted by d.A. View Post
    Yes the 40 yard dash is a football statistic, but sprinters very often run the 60 yard dash for training purposes. As for the 4.38 number, that’s what Canadian Ben Johnson was clocked in at the 40 yard mark in his record breaking day in the 1988 Seoul Olympics. Had his records not been stripped due to his undeniable usage of steroids, his records for the 100 meter, 150 meter and 200 meter dashes would be in good standing today – he is widely regarded as the fastest man with the help of steroids. His time trials from that day remain the fastest “accurate” measurements of the 40 yard dash in history. The Olympic “accurate” is much more strict than any professional program in the world. I would use Justin Gatlin's (current world record holder for the 100 meter dash) times as reference but Justin Gatlin is an "afterburner" sprinter that has a higher maximum speed and a slower start in comparision to Ben Johnson.

    As for the NFL, Reggie Bush was clocked in at 4.33 (official) and Houston Texan Jerome Mathis ran a 4.28 (official). Many sprinting professionals (Olympic committee included) find it hard to believe that two slightly above average college track talents are only a nose behind the NCAA leaders in the 100 meter dash. Frankly it’s kind of hard to believe that half the NFL would challenge the Olympic field for sprinting if they were to participate. Sure it’s based on split times but still, these football players who don’t even focus on speed regimens are suddenly capable of keeping up with world level sprinters that train specifically for sprinting? Unrealistic by any logical thinking.

    The math for it:

    1 yard = .9144 meters; 60 yards = 36.576 meters; that’s 36.576% of a 100 yard dash. The main equation is:

    (40 Yard Dash Time) / 36.576 - (A small number to cancel out the acceration resistance) = A valid 100 meter dash time.

    Since we can't accurately measure acceration resistance I'll leave that out of my numbers.

    Using that, Jerome Mathis would run a 100 meter dash in 11.7 and Reggie Bush would run a 11.838; that’s faster than three-fourths of the Olympic qualifiers. Add in the fact that that’s using a number that includes accelerating from a zero terminal velocity and their times would be a lot faster than that. Even bordering sub 10 seconds. Unless the NFL is suddenly on par with world sprinting, something is wrong with NFL timing system.

    The record for the 60 yard dash is 6.39 by Maurice Greene in 1998, and since 40 yards is 2/3rds of the 60 yard dash, you can accurately estimate the 60 yard dash time from the 40 yard dash time. Let's take Jerome Mathis as an example. Using his 4.28 and dividing it by 2/3rds to compensate for the extra 20 meters, we get 6.30 - a number that beats Maurice Greene's record by almost a full tenth of a second. Jerome Mathis's 60 yard dash time in this sense already beats the world record holder, add in the fact that his terminal velocity is much higher at the 40 yard mark than the 0 yard mark and his time would only get faster, beating the record by an even bigger margin. Jermone Mathis is the fastest 60 yard dash sprinter in the world? I think not.


    While I do think the mark 4.2 has been broken, I just think that the NFL’s "official" times are hardly official at all.

    Here’s an in-depth olympic committee article I found that includes most of the points I brought about.



    Actually a 4.2 time on the 40 yard dash is the equivalent of a long distance runner running a mile in four minutes flat. It was believed for a long time that no one could run a 4 minute mile – same for the 4.2 in the 40 yard dash which still hasn’t been broken officially. Rather than using the number because someone accomplished a 4.2, I'm sure the author used it as a reference number. For the lack of a better term; it’s a “magic goal” that athletes strive to accomplish - like scoring 100 points in a basketball game or pitching the perfect game in baseball or getting perfect 10s in gymnastics or ice skating.
    i didnt really read all of this. but basically u are saying that there is something wrong with the nfl timing system? also, i didnt really see any reason for why the world-class sprinters are faster than football players and if we do the math out(like u did) it "seems" logical that nfl players can compete in the olympics, which is not true? so can you tell me the reason why sprinters are faster?

  5. #15
    kickdim is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    i heard of that too, thats why a lot of ppl do not believe in the nfl 40 times

    but u said 11.7 would be olymipic qualifer and 4 min mile impossible?
    top middle school kids can run 11.7 and 4 min mile has been broken by a high schooler...

  6. #16
    d.A. is offline Senior Member Well Known
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    Quote Originally Posted by dkhw View Post
    i didnt really read all of this. but basically u are saying that there is something wrong with the nfl timing system? also, i didnt really see any reason for why the world-class sprinters are faster than football players and if we do the math out(like u did) it "seems" logical that nfl players can compete in the olympics, which is not true? so can you tell me the reason why sprinters are faster?
    ...Those are questions you wouldn't need to ask if you read my short version - even less if you read the article provided.

    The point that I made (the article as well) is that the "official" times in the NFL are not really official. They are bloated numbers.

    Quote Originally Posted by d.A.
    Sure it’s based on split times but still, these football players who don’t even focus on speed regimens are suddenly capable of keeping up with world level sprinters that train specifically for sprinting? Unrealistic by any logical thinking.
    Football players don't even work on sprinting techniques. Both Reggie Bush and Jerome Mathis learned their sprinting techniques from college track. It's completely illogical to think that most of them are on par with a track stars who have to condition and improve their technique practically everyday just to keep up at the olympic level. Much more just to improve their times by a mere hundreth of a second.

    It's indeed logical for some players to be able to qualify for the Olympics, however it's not logical to think that half the NFL is faster than Ben Johnson, nor that 3/4ths of the NFL qualify for the olympic sprinting competitions.

    At the elite level of any sport, talent is at an optimum - what then seperates each athlete is hard work and technique training. Sprinting is no exception.

    They are different levels of competition. It's like a high school team vs a pro team - one is undoubtably at a higher level.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kickdim
    i heard of that too, thats why a lot of ppl do not believe in the nfl 40 times

    but u said 11.7 would be olymipic qualifer and 4 min mile impossible?
    top middle school kids can run 11.7 and 4 min mile has been broken by a high schooler...
    No, I said running a four minute mile was for a long time thought to be impossible, hence the standing obsession for long distance runners to break four flat. A four minute mile is very possible nowadays, however you would have to have ideal genetics and intense training to break it. Don Bowden - the high schooler in question - had both, which is why we went on to break many long distance records in his time.

    40 Yard & 100 meter dash times by nature are exponential equations - Your speed at 0 meters is slower than your speed at 10 meters and your speed at 10 meters is much slower than your speed at 20 meters and so on. The problem of using a linear equation is that your using only one speed to measure the whole race, when in real life your speed increases at each point of the race.

    That's where that 11.7 number comes in, it's the olympic qualifying time relative only to the linear equation using a compilation of 10 meter and 20 meter dash splits. I only used it to simplify the math for the example, however if you use the same figures and use an exponential estimate you get the real accurate times. The position is derivative to speed aspect of calculus can be used to be even more accurate.

    In this case, the number that pops out from using a exponential equation is sub 10.25 without a subtraction to wind resistance, which is already well below the Olympic qualifying time of the 2004 Olympics. Factor in a wind subtraction of just a mere .02 and that number becomes 10.05 - only .04 of a second behind the college record for 2006.

    Which leads back to the original discrepancy : Jerome Mathis, a slightly above average track talent, is only a few hundreths of a second behind track prodigy Harvey Glance? It doesn't make sense.

    Where does that lead to? The original NFL "official" 40 yard dash figures are well bloated.
    Last edited by d.A.; 10-25-2006 at 06:27 PM. Reason: Added Material.

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  7. #17
    kinglee313 is offline Senior Member Frequent Poster
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    Well they say that Joey Galloway can run a 4.18. They even have reports of him breaking 4.0.

  8. #18
    firedauz is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    I ain't reading thru that wall of textz.

  9. #19
    El Gus is offline Senior Member Long Time Member
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    Then why did you post? If you have nothing to add, you're a waste of space.

    To H.R.;

    Sena's speed is made up. It's a very fast speed, because it's an exaggeration. A lot of things are real in this manga; Sena's speed is not one of them.
    Why So Green And Lonely? We Are Accidents Waiting To Happen.

  10. #20
    burp154 is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    It would be impossible in real life to run like Sena since not all teams have a good line and the line decides if a runningback is going to run good or not

 

 
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