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  1. #11
    iron skull is offline Senior Member Well Known
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    hah, your information is a little apache.
    adopted by 1cor1313

  2. #12
    Aikido is offline Senior Member Community Builder
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    hey now! although there are ways to prevent it from happening, it doesnt exclude the possibility that a good number of people will not think/know to take those precautions. So, nuff of this "info is wrong" crap.

  3. #13
    child_of_serenity's Avatar
    child_of_serenity is offline Senior Member Always Around
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    Puh, the government and everyone spies on you anyway... you just have to try and get over the fact, that the American government pays the Canadians and the Brits to watch your every move.

  4. #14
    Volvogga's Avatar
    Volvogga is offline Senior Member Always Around
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aikido
    hey now! although there are ways to prevent it from happening, it doesnt exclude the possibility that a good number of people will not think/know to take those precautions. So, nuff of this "info is wrong" crap.
    February 09, 2006

    Google Copies Your Hard Drive - Government Smiles in Anticipation

    Consumers Should Not Use New Google Desktop
    San Francisco - Google today announced a new "feature" of its Google Desktop software that greatly increases the risk to consumer privacy. If a consumer chooses to use it, the new "Search Across Computers" feature will store copies of the user's Word documents, PDFs, spreadsheets and other text-based documents on Google's own servers, to enable searching from any one of the user's computers. EFF urges consumers not to use this feature, because it will make their personal data more vulnerable to subpoenas from the government and possibly private litigants, while providing a convenient one-stop-shop for hackers who've obtained a user's Google password.
    "Coming on the heels of serious consumer concern about government snooping into Google's search logs, it's shocking that Google expects its users to now trust it with the contents of their personal computers," said EFF Staff Attorney Kevin Bankston. "If you use the Search Across Computers feature and don't configure Google Desktop very carefully—and most people won't—Google will have copies of your tax returns, love letters, business records, financial and medical files, and whatever other text-based documents the Desktop software can index. The government could then demand these personal files with only a subpoena rather than the search warrant it would need to seize the same things from your home or business, and in many cases you wouldn't even be notified in time to challenge it. Other litigants—your spouse, your business partners or rivals, whoever—could also try to cut out the middleman (you) and subpoena Google for your files."
    The privacy problem arises because the Electronic Communication Privacy Act of 1986, or ECPA, gives only limited privacy protection to emails and other files that are stored with online service providers—much less privacy than the legal protections for the same information when it's on your computer at home. And even that lower level of legal protection could disappear if Google uses your data for marketing purposes. Google says it is not yet scanning the files it copies from your hard drive in order to serve targeted advertising, but it hasn't ruled out the possibility, and Google's current privacy policy appears to allow it.
    "This Google product highlights a key privacy problem in the digital age," said Cindy Cohn, EFF's Legal Director. "Many Internet innovations involve storing personal files on a service provider's computer, but under outdated laws, consumers who want to use these new technologies have to surrender their privacy rights. If Google wants consumers to trust it to store copies of personal computer files, emails, search histories and chat logs, and still 'not be evil,' it should stand with EFF and demand that Congress update the privacy laws to better reflect life in the wired world."
    For more on Google's data collection:
    http://news.com.com/FAQ+When+Google+...66.html?tag=nl http://www.boston.com/news/nation/articles/2006/01/21/google_subpoena_roils_the_web http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/articl...DGEPGPHA61.DTL http://news.com.com/%20Bill+would+fo...3-6036951.html
    Contact:
    Kevin Bankston
    Staff Attorney
    Electronic Frontier Foundation
    bankston@eff.org
    Posted at 11:04 AM
    OK. There. Now then, I never said your info was wrong. I just said that it was over inflated as to what the implications of using Google Desktop as a whole were. Read both your origonal post and mine again. Hell, read the topic. You attack the product and company as a whole for a reason that I find to be rather weak. It says "EFF urges consumers not to use this feature, because it will make their personal data more vulnerable to subpoenas from the government and possibly private litigants, while providing a convenient one-stop-shop for hackers who've obtained a user's Google password."

    So once again, it is the feature, which you have to turn on and sign up for a google account yourself, that they don't want you to use. And as I said before, EFF is a little harsh with their titles sometimes.

    My point is, Google is not 't3h evilness', they are not sellouts, and they are not the government's bitch. Making such a claim is jumping the gun, as that summation of yours apparently did. The product is fine, the feature and the legislation is inherently flawed.
    Vol~

    thanks to Silverwmoon!

  5. #15
    Aikido is offline Senior Member Community Builder
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    the summation was not mine. I was merely posting an article because I found it interesting. I honestly do not particularly care what google does, and enjoy them as a company. gmail is a wonderful thing.

    I also never said that google was the governments bitch. I'm somewhat confused where you got that idea from. I am fully aware that google and the dept. of justice are in a legal battle right now.

 

 
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