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  1. #21
    Sherman is offline Senior Member Always Around
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    Yeah I remember I had a math teacher who had a real thick accent so it was difficult to understand what he was talking about. Accents in general I don't have a problem with, but when it gets to that point, it is a hassle.

    But I have to disagree with SD here - if you're a foreign language teacher and can speak the language which you are teaching, then if your ability in the country's local language isn't so hot, that's the only time when you can get away with it, I think. I am a foreign teacher - English in Japan. My English is awesome, but my Japanese isn't so hot. But then, what needs to be known is written down. The stuff which it's important to hear me pronounce isn't Japanese, it's English. That's the whole point of having a native speaker teach the foreign language in the first place!

    On that note, though, how about this - I'm from New Zealand, so I have a New Zealand accent. Japanese people are by and large used to American accents in English, thanks to your tawdry globalisation through music and movies. So when they are used to hearing, for example, "gr(eh)ss" (that nasal, high-pitched "a"), and I say "gr(ah)ss" (the lower, more refined "a"), they can get a bit confused about what I mean, and some teachers have asked that I speak to the students in a faux American accent. Do you guys think it's more important for me to speak in an American accent to help with understanding, or in my natural accent to help with making them familiar with the wider range of accents out there?

    Also,
    Quote Originally Posted by Kolox View Post
    it's kinda funny to hear "Divide your sister by two"
    I divided your sister in two last night.

    Can't believe nobody beat me to that.

  2. #22
    shautieh's Avatar
    shautieh is offline Senior Member Community Builder
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    ^ so they prefer American accent in japan ? In France we have to learn the English accent, not some byproduct

    That's why I don't really bother with my accent anyway... it won't work with 90% of the people you are going to meet, so it's kinda pointless to begin with (there is a minimum, but afterwards it's just a matter of adaptation !).

  3. #23
    StealDragon's Avatar
    StealDragon is offline Super Moderator Community Builder
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    English has far too many dialects. >_<

  4. #24
    98abaile's Avatar
    98abaile is offline Senior Member Community Builder
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    Quote Originally Posted by StealDragon View Post
    English has far too many dialects. >_<
    Tha' 'e does butt, tha' 'e does.
    Last edited by 98abaile; 12-13-2007 at 09:41 AM.

  5. #25
    lews_therin_tel is offline Senior Member Long Time Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by StealDragon View Post
    English has far too many dialects. >_<
    Tell that to the chinese.

    @sherman, that sucks. And above all it surprises me as Japan has many many australian and new zealandish visitors. I think you should just speak naturally, for both sides sake.

  6. #26
    fiks_me_manga is offline Senior Member Long Time Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by shautieh View Post
    ^ so they prefer American accent in japan ? In France we have to learn the English accent, not some byproduct .
    The same goes for Belgium, they teach using the English accent. Some teachers can really be an ass about it.
    Flyer than a piece of paper bearing my name,

    The Private Potion, don't drink it!!!

  7. #27
    lews_therin_tel is offline Senior Member Long Time Member
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    ^We got taught brittish english, but american was accepted, just not taught.

    BTW: I just don't understand how maths can be hard to understand even with bad english (or whatever language you prefer). When it is written in number it gets clear anyway. Perhaps not at ultra complexity levels but as an average person studying?

  8. #28
    shautieh's Avatar
    shautieh is offline Senior Member Community Builder
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    ^ math teachers are supposed to explain what these numbers and etc. mean, so they absolutely have to speak the native language well !

  9. #29
    lews_therin_tel is offline Senior Member Long Time Member
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    ^But numbers speak for themselves. I never understand shit until they show me the numbers anyway. Then it's clear as crystal. I never understand the textbooks either, but here as well the example tells a tale of itself.

  10. #30
    Kolox is offline Senior Member Community Builder
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    You know, there is a point in math that you have little of those numbers, like in derivative, integral or matrix. Try explaining that with sole numbers...

 

 
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